© 2017 Amber Waves All Rights Reserved

Black Copper French Marans Chicken

Other name(s): French Marans Chicken Scientific name: Gallus gallus domesticus Country / Place of origin: France History: This variety is exceedingly rare, and most hatcheries don't even offer them, whether as eggs or day-old chicks. The Marans breed was developed originally developed in France in the mid 1800's in the town for which it bears its name, Marans. (This is why the name of the breed always has the "S" at the end, whether singular or plural.) Marans became popular for their dark mahogany-brown eggs--a trait they are still known for today. Black Coppers have the capability of laying the darkest eggs of all the "chocolate egger Current Uses: Mostly eggs, but meat also. The Marans is unique for producing a dark chocolate brown colored egg. In the best strains the eggs are so dark they are almost black. Appearance: The Black Copper rooster is black with copper-colored hackles, shoulders, and saddle.  The hens are mostly black with glints of copper in their hackles. Average weight: 7 - 8 lbs. Lifespan: It's common for a hen in a backyard setting to live 8-10 years, but we've also heard reports of chickens living as many as 20 years! The older they get, of course, the fewer eggs they lay, but think of all their other valuable functions besides being a loved member of the family: tick-eating, mosquito-eating, and fly-eating, not to mention they're still fertilizer machines! When Do they start laying eggs? On average, pullets, or juvenile hens, start laying eggs at about 6 months of age, depending on the breed. However, if your birds come into maturity at the coldest, darkest part of the year, they will sometimes not begin laying until spring: six months is just the average! Egg color: Chocolate Brown. This color is achieved by a coating that is applied in the last part of the laying process, that since it is only on the surface, you can rub it off with a little work. Egg size: Large to Jumbo Eggs a week/year: 3-4 eggs a week 150-180 a year, Broody: Occasionally Confinement: They generally take confinement well. Compatibility: They typically get along well with others. Hardy: They are good with cold because they were initially bred in a damp environment. Diet Feed the chickens commercially-prepared chicken feed. Also, supply them with fresh water. Chickens also need grit to help them digest their food. Keep the coop clean at all times. This can be supplemented with chicken scratch and produce. If your chickens are allowed to roam free then they will enjoy their natural foods of bugs, slugs, and seeds. Housing: Build a chicken coop or adapt an existing building. You need at least 3 square feet per layer. Provide at least one nesting box for every four chickens. Your laying hens also appreciate a place to roost. . Behavior / Temperament / Activity level: Not as vocal as other chickens, generally they are active, but may become lazy if not given the proper space.

Black Copper French

Marans Chicken

© 2016 Amber Waves All Rights Reserved

Black Copper French Marans Chicken

Other name(s): French Marans Chicken Scientific name: Gallus gallus domesticus Country / Place of origin: France History: This variety is exceedingly rare, and most hatcheries don't even offer them, whether as eggs or day-old chicks. The Marans breed was developed originally developed in France in the mid 1800's in the town for which it bears its name, Marans. (This is why the name of the breed always has the "S" at the end, whether singular or plural.) Marans became popular for their dark mahogany-brown eggs--a trait they are still known for today. Black Coppers have the capability of laying the darkest eggs of all the "chocolate egger Current Uses: Mostly eggs, but meat also. The Marans is unique for producing a dark chocolate brown colored egg. In the best strains the eggs are so dark they are almost black. Appearance: The Black Copper rooster is black with copper- colored hackles, shoulders, and saddle.  The hens are mostly black with glints of copper in their hackles. Average weight: 7 - 8 lbs. Lifespan: It's common for a hen in a backyard setting to live 8-10 years, but we've also heard reports of chickens living as many as 20 years! The older they get, of course, the fewer eggs they lay, but think of all their other valuable functions besides being a loved member of the family: tick-eating, mosquito-eating, and fly-eating, not to mention they're still fertilizer machines! When Do they start laying eggs? On average, pullets, or juvenile hens, start laying eggs at about 6 months of age, depending on the breed. However, if your birds come into maturity at the coldest, darkest part of the year, they will sometimes not begin laying until spring: six months is just the average! Egg color: Chocolate Brown. This color is achieved by a coating that is applied in the last part of the laying process, that since it is only on the surface, you can rub it off with a little work. Egg size: Large to Jumbo Eggs a week/year: 3-4 eggs a week 150-180 a year, Broody: Occasionally Confinement: They generally take confinement well. Compatibility: They typically get along well with others. Hardy: They are good with cold because they were initially bred in a damp environment. Diet Feed the chickens commercially-prepared chicken feed. Also, supply them with fresh water. Chickens also need grit to help them digest their food. Keep the coop clean at all times. This can be supplemented with chicken scratch and produce. If your chickens are allowed to roam free then they will enjoy their natural foods of bugs, slugs, and seeds. Housing: Build a chicken coop or adapt an existing building. You need at least 3 square feet per layer. Provide at least one nesting box for every four chickens. Your laying hens also appreciate a place to roost. . Behavior / Temperament / Activity level: Not as vocal as other chickens, generally they are active, but may become lazy if not given the proper space.